Why John Lennon Felt 'Let It Be' Didn't Suit The Beatles

Lennon was originally unimpressed by the song

April 13, 2020
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One of The Beatles most famous and recognizable songs of all time is one that would not have seen the light of day if it were up to John Lennon.

"Let It Be" came from The Beatles 1970 album of the same name and at that point in the group's history, tensions between John Lennon and Paul McCartney were especially high.

Ultimate Classic Rock took a look at the history of the song and the noted tension between the two at the time. McCartney and Lennon had always shared two different styles of writing and methods of creativity, but this recording session was different.

The roots of "Let It Be" go back to a dream Paul McCartney had about his mother during the sessions for The Beatles. Paul penned the phrase "let it be" after his mother had told him it in the dream.

When McCartney brought the song to the group, Lennon was unimpressed. He felt the style didn't suit The Beatles later saying, “It could’ve been Wings. I don’t know what he’s thinking when he writes ‘Let It Be.’”

Lennon didn't want to be associated with the composition of the song and in a 1980 Playboy interview said "That's Paul. What can you say? Nothing to do with The Beatles."

Another source of Lennon's frustration came from the song's reference to "Mother Mary." McCartney explained that it was in reference to his mother, who died of cancer when he was fourteen years old. Lennon wasn't having any of it and detested any lyrics that could be attributed as religious.

Despite Lennon's dislike of the song, it immediately jumped to number one on the charts after it was released.

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